Filtering by Tag: mucus

Clearly Invisible : Fighting the Flu

This segment of the blog is dedicated to shedding light on the invisible side of CF- striving to spark dialogue, cultivate understanding, and encourage compassion between all of us.

We are in prime Flu season and this time of year can be a bit unnerving for people with CF. While there's no guarantee I won't catch the flu, I take some extra precautions and implement some thoughtful habits to help protect me throughout this season. Here's my advice for getting through the season: 

  • Wash your hands and use hand-sanitizer often.
     
  • Keep it clean – use a disinfectant daily to keep your living environment clean. Wipe down door handles, light switches, faucets, remotes, keyboards, fridge handles, etc. Keeping these high traffic areas disinfected daily will help the spread of compromising germs that could be detrimental to a person with CF’s health – or anyone whose immune system is compromised.
     
  • Disposable hand towels – It may seem like a small thing but replacing your cloth hand towel in the bathroom with disposable hand towels can help deter the spread of germs. 
     
  • Vitamin D – Find ways to get some extra Vitamin D which during the winter months quickly depletes because of our increased time indoors and lack of sunlight. Make sure to take all your vitamins and eat vitamin rich foods. It’s important for people with CF to take in extra vitamins as our bodies do not efficiently absorb vital nutrients.
     
  • Make weight – My CF team has a catchy phrase when it comes to CF and extra weight: “more fluff, more puff.” I know during Influenza season it’s important for me to be dedicated to maintaining or even gaining weight so my body can better fight off infection. Studies have linked increased BMI to increased or stabilized lung function in CF. A large portion of the CF population has difficulty maintaining and gaining weight which has significant effects on the body’s ability to fight infection and maintain lung function.
     
  • Sinus rinses – Daily sinuses rinses help clear out the sinuses and help flush away possible infection that was breathed in during the day. If I have been around a large crowd or in a busy public area I will make sure and do a sinus rinse as soon as I am able.
     
  • Get adequate rest and stay hydrated – A person with CF uses a significant amount of energy just to breathe and do basic everyday tasks. Becoming worn down and dehydrated can be detrimental to our health and can quickly spiral into an exacerbation.
     
  • Get vaccinated and share the importance of those around you getting vaccinated.
     
  • Keep the distance - during peak flu season be cautious about being around a lot of people and in busy public places. Take the appropriate precautions if heading into crowded areas and weigh the risks of needing to go out. It’s best to keep your distance from large groups of people and places you know may be filled with deadly Influenza germs. Weigh the risks and benefits of heading out and maybe grab a mask, hand sanitizer, and try not to touch your face.
     
  • Speak up – Don’t be afraid to remind people that covering a cough, exposure to illness, and hand washing can mean life or death to people with compromised immune systems – especially respiratory issues like CF. Staying away from people who are sick is the best way to avoid infection.
     
  • Stay connected – Influenza A can be deadly for people with CF. It’s important that if you feel any symptoms to call your clinic or go in immediately. 


     

Today's entry is written from the perspective of Ashley Ballou-Bonnema.

Please consult your CF care team if you have concerns about Influenza A or if you want to make any changes to your CF regimen. For more information about Influenza and CF read "Influenza: Learn How to Stay Healthy" from the Cystic Fibrosis Foundation.

Disclaimer: The writings and postings of Breathe 3-65 are a reflection of the personal opinions, experiences, and knowledge of the contributing author. Breathe Bravely is not liable for the statements and personal opinions shared. The material of Breathe 3-65 is provided with the best intention and great care is taken to share information from credible sources. However, the content shared on this blog is not medical advice and is not under any condition a substitute for the medical advice provided by your medical providers. Please consult your care team before making any changes or additions to your current CF treatment plan.

Real 65 : An Undeniable Brilliance

Real 65 is a segment of Breathe 3-65 that is dedicated to entries and interviews sharing honest and personal experiences of living with, treating, and loving someone with Cystic Fibrosis.
It is a place for all those impacted to share their stories. 

 

An Undeniable Brilliance

Reese, an unstoppable 7 year old with CF.

You can't see the countless hours spent doing treatments, the number of pills taken everyday, or the thick haze left from the nebulizer. The only thing that steals the attention in this photo is the undeniable brilliance of life and beauty that fill it. 

 

 

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Disclaimer: The writings and postings of Breathe 3-65 are a reflection of the personal opinions, experiences, and knowledge of the contributing author. Breathe Bravely is not liable for the statements and personal opinions shared. The material of Breathe 3-65 is provided with the best intention and great care is taken to share information from credible sources. However, the content shared on this blog is not medical advice and is not under any condition a substitute for the medical advice provided by your medical providers. Please consult your care team before making any changes or additions to your current CF treatment plan.

Simply CF : Signs & Symptoms

Cystic Fibrosis is a complex and sometimes confusing disease.
Each installment of Breathe 3-65 called,"Simply CF" will strive to explain the complexities of CF in a concise and accessible way.

Even though CF is an invisible disease on the outside the symptoms and complications associated with the disease are not. Breathe 3-65 has shared the complications of CF in our previous post Simply CF : It’s Complicated but what are some of the specific signs and symptoms of CF?

Cough – Because CF impacts the lungs and causes extra thick, sticky mucus to build up in the body, the respiratory system’s defense amidst such irritation and complications is persistent coughing. Coughing is the body's way of trying to move the mucus up and out, clearing the airways. With this extra irritation can come wheezing and breathlessness.

Poor Growth – That thick, sticky mucus also affects the pancreas and its ability to effectively work to produce enzymes. Without those key enzymes the body is unable to adequately take in vital nutrients and effectively digest food. This can lead to malnourishment and can stunt development.

Respiratory Complications – That excess of thick, sticky mucus in the lungs is a perfect place for bacteria and infection to thrive, causing frequent lung infections such as pneumonia or bronchitis. It can also cause people to have frequent issues and infections associated with the sinuses.

Salty Skin – Before there was even such a name for it, parents of children with CF would note a salty taste to their children's skin when they would kiss them. CF causes the body to produce an imbalance of chloride in the body making sweat extra salty.

Digestive Complications – Because of complications with the pancreas, problems with digestion are common. This complication then causes difficulties with bowel movements, frequent greasy or bulky stools, or intestinal blockages.

The body is incredibly complex. Systems within our body work both simultaneously together and separately for the same ultimate purpose – to live. Much of what keeps each of us alive takes place beneath the surface of our skin and is invisible to the unknowing eye. CF is an invisible disease and most of its symptoms are equally invisible to the eye. However, the symptoms and signs of CF are anything but invisible within the bodies of those affected. 

 

 

Only a doctor or trained medical professional can diagnose cystic fibrosis. For further questions or to discuss symptoms in detail please contact your doctor.

Source: CFF.org

Disclaimer: The writings and postings of Breathe 3-65 are a reflection of the personal opinions, experiences, and knowledge of the contributing author. Breathe Bravely is not liable for the statements and personal opinions shared. The material of Breathe 3-65 is provided with the best intention and great care is taken to share information from credible sources. However, the content shared on this blog is not medical advice and is not under any condition a substitute for the medical advice provided by your medical providers. Please consult your care team before making any changes or additions to your current CF treatment plan.

Real 65 : Building Blocks of Every Breath

Real 65 is a segment of Breathe 3-65 that is dedicated to entries and interviews sharing honest and personal experiences of living with, treating, and loving someone with Cystic Fibrosis.
It is a place for all those impacted to share their stories. 

 

The Building Blocks of Every Breath

For someone with CF, there are countless hours devoted to every breath - hours of airway clearance therapy, hundreds of neb cups that need to be sterilized, and countless medicine vials that need to be refilled.

 

 

 

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Disclaimer: The writings and postings of Breathe 3-65 are a reflection of the personal opinions, experiences, and knowledge of the contributing author. Breathe Bravely is not liable for the statements and personal opinions shared. The material of Breathe 3-65 is provided with the best intention and great care is taken to share information from credible sources. However, the content shared on this blog is not medical advice and is not under any condition a substitute for the medical advice provided by your medical providers. Please consult your care team before making any changes or additions to your current CF treatment plan.

Simply CF : It's Complicated

Cystic Fibrosis is a complex and sometimes confusing disease.
Each installment of Breathe 3-65 called,"Simply CF" will strive to explain the complexities of CF in a concise and accessible way. 

 

 

CF is a complex disease that does not isolate itself to one specific area of the body. Its primary effects may manifest in the lungs and pancreas, but its devastation can be felt through every major system of the body.

The Lungs - Because of the defective CFTR protein talked about in the previous post, “Simply CF : The Cause Of It All”, the body produces a thick sticky mucus that clogs the airways and respiratory system. This thick mucus is a perfect environment for deadly bacteria and infection to thrive leading to clogged airways, scarring, excessive and recurrent respiratory infections, and decreased lung function.

The Pancreas - Sticky and thick mucus cause plugging in ducts of the pancreas, preventing the release of normal enzymes to aid in digestion and absorption of fats and proteins. This can result in malnourishment and a failure to thrive. Some people with CF have difficulty gaining and maintaining a healthy weight.

Sweat glands - A loss of too much salt through a person with CF's sweat causes an imbalance of vital minerals and dehydration in the body. 

Much More - Because these main organs and systems are directly affected by cystic fibrosis, secondary complications can arise in other vital organs and systems in the body: cardiovascular system, reproductive system, liver, gallbladder, kidneys, CFRD (Cystic Fibrosis Related Diabetes), bowel obstructions, increased risks of cancer, sinusitis and nasal polyps, osteoporosis, and arthritis. 

 CF is a complex and complicated disease that manifests itself differently in every person diagnosed. The disease affects each person in so many different ways making treatment of the same disease in two different people a challenge. It is so important that new treatments continue to be researched and studied - giving insight into CF's complexity that may lead to life-altering treatments for each unique person with CF.  

 

 

 

Source: John Hopkins CF Center- hopkinscf.org

 

 

Disclaimer: The writings and postings of Breathe 3-65 are a reflection of the personal opinions, experiences, and knowledge of the contributing author. Breathe Bravely is not liable for the statements and personal opinions shared. The material of Breathe 3-65 is provided with the best intention and great care is taken to share information from credible sources. However, the content shared on this blog is not medical advice and is not under any condition a substitute for the medical advice provided by your medical providers. Please consult your care team before making any changes or additions to your current CF treatment plan.